Open Government and eParticipation in the EU

Open Government and eParticipation in the EU

I spoke to the OpenGov and eParticipation Summit in Belfast, Northern Ireland in late September.  The event was produced by the University of Ulster with the help of a number of organizations and sponsors.  I’d met faculty from the University when they came out to visit the Open Source Lab and learn more about the OSL’s success with supporting global open source communities. was pleased to be invited to share what I’ve learned working with a number of Open Government / Open Data initiatives and the open source community in the US.

Speakers ranged from county government to senior UK government, included industry, entrepreneurs and academics.  Topics extended to open data and information exchange in health IT.   A presentation from an Italian company which produces town hall style meetings using electronic voting described their product and process.  The system was utilized during the Day 2 eParticpation Summit.  The software interestingly enough was actually written by the Tuscany government and is available as open source.

It was interesting to see the conference and summit take the policy issues related to open data head on.  In contrast to the US where private industry and civic advocates have driven the train while (most notably) the Federal government is de-funding transparency sites, Ireland and the UK governments themselves seem more engaged in creating a road map for opening their data and making that transition sustainable.  At the same time, the open source community seems less engaged there in supporting more civic and volunteer approaches to opening up government.

GOSCON 2011 Shakes Up Government IT

This year’s theme for the Innovation Nation Forum, which was co-located with GOSCON, was “Shake It Up,” and things were shaken up indeed. While we were a little sad that this year’s conference wrapped up early due the East Coast earthquake, we’re all pleased that no one was harmed. Plus, we did get to shake up all things government IT and open source before the lunch hour, presenting two panels on “Cost Take Out” and “Building Outside the Box.”

You can read more from the panels in the GOSCON and GOSCON DC Tweet streams. My colleague Gunnar Hellekson from RedHat has penned an excellent post on opensource.com summarizing the Cost Take Out panel. Alex Howard from O’Relly Media moderated that panel plus did a great writeup of the event entitled “Government IT’s Quiet Open Source Evolution”.

The good folks at MeriTalk, producers of Innovation Nation, have shared a video of the luncheon exec panel which was underway when the quake hit.  More materials from the conference are forthcoming; promise they’ll be exciting in less seismic ways.